Subject interrogative sentences in English Grammar

Subject interrogative sentenceSubject interrogative sentences, also known as subject questions, are a type of question that focuses on the subject of a sentence. These interrogative sentences inquire about who or what performs the action or experiences the state described by the verb.

In subject interrogative sentences, the question word usually appears at the beginning of the sentence, before the auxiliary verb or main verb. The question word determines the type of information being sought. Here are some common question words used in subject interrogative sentences:

Who: Used to ask about a person or people. Example:

  • Who teaches English at the school?
  • Who speaks multiple languages fluently?
  • Who won the singing competition last year?
  • Who visited us yesterday?
  • Who is coming to the party?
  • Who ate all the cookies?

What: Used to inquire about a thing or idea. Example:

  • What caused the accident?

Which: Used to ask for a specific choice or option. Example:

  • Which book did you choose?

Whom: Used in formal English to ask about a person or people in an object position. Example:

  • Whom did you meet yesterday?

Subject interrogative sentences often require a yes or no answer or a specific noun or pronoun as a response. They seek to identify the subject of the sentence and gather information about the performer or experiencer of the action or state mentioned.

Here are some examples of subject interrogative sentences:

  1. Who is coming to the party?
  2. What caused the accident?
  3. Which book did you choose?
  4. Whom did you meet yesterday?
  5. Who is responsible for the project?
  6. What time does the movie start?

In each of these examples, the question is specifically seeking information about the subject of the sentence. The response would provide the person or thing performing the action or experiencing the state mentioned in the question.

Here are some more examples of subject interrogative sentences:

  1. Who is coming to the party?
  2. What caused the accident?
  3. Which book did you choose?
  4. Whom did you meet yesterday?
  5. Whose car is parked outside?
  6. Which team won the match?

In these examples, the question words (“who,” “what,” “which,” “whom,” “whose”) are used to inquire about the subject of the sentence, seeking specific information or clarification.

Different types of interrogative sentences:

Interrogative Sentence TypeDescriptionExample
Yes/No QuestionsThese questions require a simple “yes” or “no” answer. They seek confirmation or denial of a fact or statement.“Is it raining outside?”
Wh-QuestionsThese questions use question words (such as who, what, when, where, why, how) to gather specific information or details. They cannot be answered with a simple “yes” or “no.”“Where are you going?”
Choice QuestionsThese questions present options or alternatives, requiring the respondent to select one.“Do you want tea or coffee?”
Tag QuestionsThese questions are formed by adding a short phrase at the end of a statement to seek confirmation or agreement.“You like ice cream, don’t you?”
Rhetorical QuestionsThese questions are asked for effect or emphasis and do not require an answer. They often imply the answer or make a point.“Who doesn’t want to be successful?”

These are some common types of interrogative sentences with different purposes and structures.

Frequently Asked Questions about Interrogative Sentences in English

Q1: What is the definition of an interrogative sentence?

An interrogative sentence is a type of sentence that is used to ask a question and gather information about something. It can be a question about anything, whether casual or specific.

Q2: How is an interrogative sentence defined?

According to various dictionaries, an interrogative sentence is defined as a sentence that asks a question or makes a request for information. It has the form or force of a question and is used to inquire or seek clarification.

Q3: What are the different types of interrogative sentences?

Interrogative sentences can be categorized into three types:

  1. Choice Questions: These questions present options or alternatives for the respondent to choose from. Example: “Do you prefer tea or coffee?”
  2. Yes/No Questions: These questions require a simple “yes” or “no” answer and seek confirmation or denial of a fact or statement. Example: “Is it raining outside?”
  3. Questions with ‘Wh’ Words: These questions use question words (such as who, what, when, where, why, how) to gather specific information or details. Example: “Where are you going?”

Q4: What are the uses of interrogative sentences?

Interrogative sentences serve several purposes, including:

  • Asking direct questions to seek information.
  • Requesting clarification on a matter.
  • Confirming something with the listener.
  • Gathering information or details on a particular topic.

Q5: Can you provide some examples of interrogative sentences?

Here are a few examples of interrogative sentences:

  • “What items do we need to bring with us?”
  • “Which documents should we submit?”
  • “Aren’t you the one elected as the president of the Literary Club?”
  • “Could you please repeat that?”
  • “When you mention ‘advancements in technology,’ what exactly do you mean?”
  • “Are you sure you want to proceed with this?”
  • “Where are you going?”
  • “When is your father leaving for Turkey?”

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